Meet Dani Sango from Love’s Fortress by Jennifer Uhlarik

Meet Dani Sango from Love’s Fortress by Jennifer Uhlarik

I absolutely love character interviews. There is just something so fun in getting to know the characters you read and love in a whole different way. Today’s character interview comes from the duel-time novel Love’s Fortress by Jennifer Uhlarik. Dani Sango is the heroine of the contemporary timeline. Before we dive in getting to know her, let’s take a moment to get familiar with the story.

Love’s Fortress by Jennifer UhlarikAmazon  |  Barnes and Noble  |  Books-A-Million  |  Christianbook

An Epic Love Story From the Past Brings Closure to Dani’s Fractured Family Root

When Dani Sango’s art forger father passes away, Dani inherits his home. Among his effects is a book of Native American drawings, which leads her to seek the help of museum curator Brad Osgood to decipher the ledger art. Why would her father have this book? Is it just another forgery?

Brad Osgood’s four-year-old niece, Brynn, needs a safe home, and Brad longs to provide it. The last thing he needs is more drama, especially from a forger’s daughter. But when the two meet “accidentally” at St. Augustine’s 350-year-old Spanish fort, Castillo de San Marcos, he can’t refuse the intriguing woman.

Broken Bow is among seventy-three Plains Indians transported to Florida in 1875 for incarceration at ancient Fort Marion. Sally Jo Harris and Luke Worthing dream of serving God on a foreign mission field, but when the Indians arrive in St. Augustine, God changes their plans. Then when friendship develops between Sally Jo and Broken Bow and false accusations fly, it could cost them their lives.

Can Dani discover how Broken Bow and Sally Jo’s story ends and how it impacted her father’s life?

CC: Hi Dani! I’m so excited to meet you. Would you please introduce yourself to my readers?

DS: I’m the contemporary heroine of the novel. So what does that mean in terms of the story? Well, I am the estranged daughter of an art forger. I haven’t seen my dear ol’ dad since the day he was arrested when I was two years old. But here we are, twenty-six years later, and I get contacted by an attorney who regrets to inform me that my father has died and left me some kind of an inheritance in St. Augustine, Florida. When I drive up here from my home in Tampa, the attorney hands me a set of keys and an address and tells me Franklin Sango left me his house as part of that inheritance. Needless to say, I’m really confused and more than a little gun shy! Franklin never gave me the time of day, and now he leaves me his house? As if that’s not enough, he’s decorated the place with tons of his forgeries—and he’s got some weird ancient book of Native American artwork in his studio, and an odd message on his answering machine from a museum curator asking about that artwork. I think he was up to no good! The official reading of the will won’t be for a few days yet, so I’m stuck here to poke around the creepy place, ponder why the jerk finally decided to acknowledge my existence, and wonder whether this Native American artwork is his next big con or what. Oh joy!

CC: Oh my! Talk about complicated family relationships. I take it family gathers were not your favorite thing? 

DS: Oh, goodness, no! My family is a hot mess. With me being the daughter of a convicted art forger, I’m pretty much treated like an outsider by my mom Jessica, step-dad Neil, half-siblings, and especially my grandfather. Somehow, they all overlook the half of my DNA that comes from Mom and see only the half that comes from Franklin, so they all make me feel like I’m somehow less than them. Family relationships have been hard, and get-togethers are not fun or emotionally healthy for me.

CC: Ugh. That is so hard and heartbreaking. Is it just your family? Or how do you think others view you?

DS: You’d think being raised in the home of my well-respected neurosurgeon step-father and my socialite mother, I’d have had all the benefits that such an upbringing could afford. But my life wasn’t quite so neat and tidy. If you’re talking to my rich, elitist family’s inner circle, who all know I’m the daughter of Franklin Sango, I’m either pitied or treated like a pariah. Growing up in that kind of an environment led me to make some out-of-the-box choices. In order to get away from the toxic private prep school environment, I made the choice to transfer to a public school and make a new circle of friends. I worked in preschools during high school and college, turned down Mom and Neil’s offers of expensive cars and a private university education so I could live the life I wanted to, without their strings attached. Yeah, I’ve got school loans to pay off, but at least I can look myself in the mirror and know I’m being true to myself. I hope, with all of that, that people who aren’t aware of the specter of my questionable parentage see me as a kind, hard-working, semi-responsible woman who’s trying really hard to hold her life together…and managing to succeed some of the time.

CC: That is so hard, but you have achieved much to be proud of. Who is your least favorite person to deal with?

DS: Okay, so this one’s really hard to answer, because nothing and no one in St. Augustine is as they seem at first. Obviously, my family is a problem, as already stated. Beyond that, I could say my least favorite is the tattooed biker dude who sneaked up on me when I first entered Franklin’s house to look around. The guy scared the bejeebers out of me and threatened to call the cops when I had every right to be in Franklin’s house, per the attorney who gave me the keys. Or I could say it was the even bigger Viking wannabe guy who called the biker dude off just a minute later. But then, it turns out, they’re both former business associates of Franklin’s who were just watching over his house since his passing. Good night! They both scared the tar out of me. And that Viking wannabe—Matty Joie—he’s too persistent for my comfort! I mean, he was Franklin’s boss… Not exactly the person I feel like cozying up to. I don’t know if I can trust him, given he was Franklin’s friend. But at least he seems helpful…not exactly the creeper type, even if he does look a little terrifying! In case I didn’t mention it, the guy is huge, tattooed, and looks pretty rough…but like I said, he seems helpful, even if I don’t know whether to trust him.

CC: Yikes! That is definitely an uncomfortable situation. But certainly, not everyone’s questionable. What about the hero of the story? How would you describe him? 

DS: Well, there’s the bright spot in all of this. Brad Osgood. He’s…amazing! Tall, sweet, good-looking. He’s the art museum curator I mentioned, and we met in the most unusual way, but you’ll have to read the book to find out how. What I really like about Brad is—he’s got a beautiful heart. His younger brother and sister-in-law got themselves in a bunch of trouble, and Brad’s four-year-old niece, Brynn, needed a safe place to live. Someone to love and raise her. Without batting an eye, Brad stepped up to the plate. He’s so sweet with her, and she trusts him completely. My heart melts every time I watch them together. Yet in spite of all their own turmoil, Brad has taken time to help me ferret out the truth behind some of Franklin’s forgeries—including that Native American art I mentioned. He’s really patient with me, a non-art lover. Well, I shouldn’t say I’m a non-art lover. I’ve always avoided fine art because of Franklin. Never set foot in an art museum and took very few art classes in high school or college because I didn’t want anyone associating me with my father’s crimes. But Brad took all that in stride and is slowly helping me understand and fall in love with art in ways I never thought I could. What can I say, he’s an all-around wonderful guy!

CC: Awwww. He does sound like a wonderful guy. With such a challenging childhood, I’m curious, do you have any happy memories? What’s your favorite one?

DS: Contrary to how I’ve made my life sound so far, it hasn’t been all bad. My best friend, Rachel, and her parents have helped make it bearable. I met Rach after I transferred to the public high school, and we’ve been friends ever since. As stupid as it sounds, going over to her house, spending the night in her middle class neighborhood, binge-watching movies, and just dishing with a girlfriend…it was so deliciously normal! I’ve loved hanging with people who didn’t treat me like I was a leper because of my father’s crimes. Rachel’s family accepted me for exactly who I am and let me be a normal person for a little while. Their place quickly became a safe haven, a place of unconditional acceptance, and their house is one full of good memories.

CC: They sound like a really great family, and I look forward to finding out all the mystery behind these creepy men, the art forgeries, and that Native American journal. 

Readers, head over to your favorite retailer to check out Love’s Fortress and what is the truth behind the strange inheritance.

Jennifer Uhlarik discovered the western genre as a pre-teen when she swiped the only “horse” book she found on her older brother’s bookshelf. A new love was born. Across the next ten years, she devoured Louis L’Amour westerns and fell in love with the genre. In college at the University of Tampa, she began penning her own story of the Old West. Armed with a B.A. in writing, she has finaled and won in numerous writing competitions, and been on the ECPA best-seller list several times. In addition to writing, she has held jobs as a private business owner, a schoolteacher, a marketing director, and her favorite—a full-time homemaker. Jennifer is active in American Christian Fiction Writers, Women Writing the West, and is a lifetime member of the Florida Writers Association. She lives near Tampa, Florida, with her husband, electrical engineer son, and four fur children.

Connect with Jennifer: Website | Newsletter  | Facebook | Instagram | BookBub | Twitter | Pinterest | Goodreads

Meet Sam Mattas from Shadows in the Mind’s Eye by JanyreTromp

Meet Sam Mattas from Shadows in the Mind’s Eye by JanyreTromp

It’s my joy and honor to bring to you a character interview from one of my most recent reads, Sam Mattas from Shadows In The Mind’s Eye by Janyre Tromp. Janyre released her debut novel last month, and I am so excited to introduce you to  the hero of her book.

Before we meet Sam, allow me to introduce you to his story.

Shadows In the Mind’s Eye by Janyre TrompAmazon  |  Bookshop  | Baker Book House

Charlotte Anne Mattas longs to turn back the clock. Before her husband, Sam, went to serve his country in the war, he was the man everyone could rely on–responsible, intelligent, and loving. But the person who’s come back to their family farm is very different from the protector Annie remembers. Sam’s experience in the Pacific theater has left him broken in ways no one can understand–but that everyone is learning to fear.

Tongues start wagging after Sam nearly kills his own brother. Now when he claims to have seen men on the mountain when no one else has seen them, Annie isn’t the only one questioning his sanity and her safety. If there were criminals haunting the hills, there should be evidence beyond his claims. Is he really seeing what he says, or is his war-tortured mind conjuring ghosts?

Annie desperately wants to believe her husband. But between his irrational choices and his nightmares leaking into the daytime, she’s terrified he’s going mad. Can she trust God to heal Sam’s mental wounds–or will sticking by him mean keeping her marriage at the cost of her own life?

Debut novelist Janyre Tromp delivers a deliciously eerie, Hitchcockian story filled with love and suspense. Readers of psychological thrillers and historical fiction by Jaime Jo Wright and Sarah Sundin will add Tromp to their favorite authors list.

CC: Hi Sam! It is so great to meet you. Would you please introduce yourself to my readers?

SM: My name is Samuel Mattas. I was born on a peach orchard just north of Hot Springs, Arkansas. I was a coxswain for a Higgins boat. Despite what you may think of me now, Mama raised me right. I’m a good man. I ain’t afraid to work hard, I’m loyal, and I want good things for my family and the world.

CC: How do you think other’s view you?

SM: Used to be that folks thought I was reliable, stable. Now they’re pretty sure I’m crazy. But I ain’t and I aim to prove it.

CC: It’s hard to come back from war. I’m sure you will prove yourself to them. You’re married to Annie. How would you describe her?

SM: Annie was always the Judge’s princess, and I was little more than riff raff. Respectable enough, I suppose, but trouble nonetheless. And she was royalty. You know? So I always knew her—always dressed in lace and patent leather shoes. Her mama must’ve spent hours a week washing the dresses and polishing those shoes because Annie was always finding some way to smudge dirt on herself. Course she’d want to be clean the next second, “How dare that dirt cling to me!”

But the first time Annie met me, she was still a little tike. Me and my best friend, Doc, were out on the little pond north of the soldier’s hospital. Wasn’t far from the Judge’s house, but enough away from the springs that the pond froze clean across. The whole world was white, even the breaths puffing from our lungs. We was all wrapped in woolen sweaters, ours underneath and Pop’s on top. I’d pulled off branches for everybody and we were hitting a ball of fabric scraps across the ice, hootin’ and hollerin’ like the devil himself was after us. Having the best time we’d had in I don’t know how long.

She come sneaking out of her house a little red cardinal hopping where she wasn’t supposed to. I’d already started across the ice to warn her about the soft edges when she went through the ice. I must’ve been thirteen maybe fourteen. She was still a near baby. Blue as anything by the time I fished her out and sputtering, too. Back then, there wasn’t no way I was going to the Judge’s house. So I wrapped her up in one of my layers and hoofed it home. All the while praying she didn’t die of exposure before I got there.

Mama fixed her up and sent my sister to the Judge’s to let Mrs. Layfette know we had her little girl safe and sound. Annie had the grandest time playing paper dolls with Mary. I do think Mary was Annie’s first ever friend. I don’t know why Mrs. Layfette started letting Annie come to our place. I suppose it might have been Mary was painfully polite and Mama always had a soft spot for Annie’s Ma. I think she saw what was going to happen even back then.

I was still helping up at Papaw’s orchard then so I didn’t see her much after that. And then one day this drop-dead gorgeous woman walked through the door while I was stuffing myself with one of Mama’s sandwiches and I regretted that I hadn’t taken the time to brush my hair, shave, or even change my clothes yet that day. But Annie, she didn’t even seem to notice. Still looked at me like I set the moon in the sky. I just want to do right by her. And I don’t know if I ever will. So much has changed. I don’t even know who I am no more let alone who Annie is.

CC: My heart just rends for you both. I feel like I’ve gotten an extra bonus story just in your answer. While we saw some of in the book, this really paints the full picture. I can see why Annie looked at you like you set the moon in the sky. 

What’s your biggest fear?

SM: There’s a part of me that wishes I could go back to before…to be “normal.” But that feels like I’m betraying everyone I left buried on some beach in the Pacific. I want to be what Charlotte Anne wants, what my daughter Rosie needs. I just don’t know if I got it in me anymore. And that scares the daylights out of me. I’m used to being able to do everything.

But I don’t want to be nobody’s charity case either—least of all Annie’s dad, the Judge. There’s too many strings attached to that. I’m strong. I can work.

Still I see Annie looking sideways at me. She knows who I was, who I want to be. But the good Lord knows I ain’t what she expects no more.

Course there ain’t nobody who can tell me what I should feel unless they’ve been in a place where it was kill or be killed. Honestly, I want to forget what happened over in the Pacific. Everything the good book says makes a good person a good person is blown to smithereens in war. You go in one person…and come out something different. Sometimes I wonder if the Sam Mattas that used to be is dead and gone, sucked under the waves. All that’s left of me is some ghost haunting the people that mean the most. Ain’t no way to live. That much I’ll tell you. All I want is I protect my girls…keep them safe. How am I supposed to keep them safe when their greatest danger is me?

CC: I just want to hug you, Sam. That is all so relatable, and I wish I could make it all better for you.

On a happier note, what is one of your happiest memories?

SM: There wasn’t much extra growing up, but Mama always made sure Christmas was something special . . . even if the only present we had was the shoes we got the month before. Karo nut pie, peach preserves and fresh bread, and usually Pa would carve up one of the hogs. Meemaw and Papaw would stay the whole day in the big house, but we’d decorate the grandparent cottage up right too. My siblings, Mary and Peter, and I, we’d sometimes take an old barrel out on the pond and row it like a rich man’s boat. Only the good Lord knows how we didn’t drown in that thing. Life on the farm wasn’t easy, but Mama always made sure it was good.

CC: I really think it’s the simple things in life that make us the happiest, and I can see why those Christmases were your most cherished memories.

Do you enjoy family gatherings? 

SM: My family’s together most all the time. A farm up in the Ouachitas ain’t the easiest way to make a living so we help each other out. Annie’s family . . . what’s left of it anyway, can stay in Hot Springs where he belongs. The Judge chose his family a long time ago and we’re safer without him in our lives.

CC: I understand what it is to have everyone living together, and on having family members that it would be better to be without. Thank you so much for joining us. I really can’t wait for people to read your story and find out exactly what is truth, what is fiction, and how your family survives all that is thrown at you.

More about Janyre Tromp:

Janyre Tromp is a historical novelist whose loves spinning tales that, at their core, hunt for beauty, even when it isn’t pretty. She’s the author of Shadows in the Mind’s Eye and coauthor of O Little Town (releasing Fall 2022) and It’s a Wonderful Christmas. She’s also a book editor, published children’s book author, and lives in Grand Rapids, Michigan with her family, two crazy cats, and a slightly eccentric Shetland Sheepdog.

Connect with Janyre Tromp: Website (grab a copy of the FREE novella, Wide Open) | Facebook | Instagram | BookBub | Twitter

RCR: Dusk’s Darkest Shores by Carolyn Miller

RCR: Dusk’s Darkest Shores by Carolyn Miller

We’ve finished the fifth month of the Unlocking the Past 2022 Reading Challenge: Around the World. This month we traveled to Europe, and my choice of story was Dusk’s Darkest Shore by Carolyn Miller. Once you read my review, don’t forget to comment to be entered for your chance to win a copy.

*Want more interaction and/or suggestions each month? Join the Facebook Group. Want a bookmark with the monthly themes? Fill out this Google Form. Need a reminder on the details of the challenge? Go to the Unlocking the Past Reading Challenge page.*

Dusk’s Darkest Shores

by Carolyn Miller

It was such a joy to dive into a Carolyn Miller book. Someone initially compared it to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, and while there might have been very loose parallels on occasion, this was its own beautiful story. Resplendent with a beautiful setting, a woman with a tender heart and special connection with God, and a blind hero, it was a unique read. I really appreciated the way the story dealt with God not answering prayers in the way we want, and leaving the reader with hope.

I would recommend this book to anyone who loves regency stories, stories of spinster women finding love, spiritual threads that are strong but not preachy, and heroes who are not your typical hero.

(Forgive the especially short review. I’m editing and really tired. 😉 )


Genre: Historical Romance, Regency

Plot Overview:

How can a meek wallflower help a returning war hero whose dreams are plunged into darkness?

Mary Bloomfield has no illusions. Her chances for matrimony have long since passed her by. Still, her circumstances are pleasant enough, especially now that she has found purpose in assisting her father with his medical practice in England’s beautiful Lake District. Even without love, it’s a peaceful life.

That is until Adam Edgerton returns to the sleepy district. This decorated war hero did not arrive home to acclaim and rest, but to a new battle against the repercussions of an insidious disease. Mary’s caring nature cannot stand to see someone suffer–but how can she help this man see any brightness in his future when he’s plunged into melancholic darkness, his dreams laid waste by his condition?

Adam wants no charity, but he’s also no coward. If this gentle woman can work hard, how can he do less? Together they struggle to find a way forward for him. Frustration and antipathy slowly develop into friendship and esteem. Then a summer storm atop a mountain peak leads to scandal–and both Mary and Adam must search the depths of their closed hearts for answers if they hope to find any future path with happiness at its end.

Best-selling author Carolyn Miller is back with a fresh series that will not only thrill readers eager for more of her work, but bring in new fans looking for beautiful writing, fascinating research, deftly woven love stories, and real faith lived out in the Regency period.

What I loved: Adam’s spiritual walk and personal walk in learning how to live as a blind man. I found inspiration in his struggles.

Favorite Character and Why: Adam. While not always the most gentle in his responses, you could tell he was a good man who struggled. It felt real and relatable as he learned to accept a future different from the one he envisioned.

Who would like this? I would recommend this book to anyone who loves regency stories, stories of spinster women finding love, spiritual threads that are strong but not preachy, and heroes who are not your typical hero. 

PURCHASE LINKS

Amazon  |  Barnes & Noble  |  Books-a-Million  |  Book Depository  |  Bookshop.org  |  Christianbook.com  |  Indiebound.org

 


Giveaway

For your chance to win a book from my prize stash, comment with what book YOU read for this month and you will also be entered into the year-end Grand Prize Reader Basket. Use the Rafflecopter below for extra entries and to mark that you left a comment. Entries end on June 7th at midnight EST, and the winner will be drawn sometime that week and notified by email. The winner will be announced don’t the Rafflecopter widget. *Open to all residents of the contiguous USA, legally able to enter, and an e-book format or Amazon Gift Card will be awarded to those outside that range who are legally able to enter.

a Rafflecopter giveaway


What did you read for May’s Challenge? What do you hope to read in June’s?

Shadows in the Mind’s Eye by Janyre Tromp

Shadows in the Mind’s Eye by Janyre Tromp

Shadows in the Mind’s Eye

by Janyre Tromp

This story is one of those that sticks with you for a while. It’s not for the faint of heart either, as it delves into PTSD, a soldier’s homecoming that is nothing like anyone wanted, and a corrupt town that infiltrates all aspects of life. There were times when Sam (the hero) wondered if he was losing his mind, overreacting, or really seeing something he needed to act upon, and boy do I identify with that one when it comes to caregiving. I also understood Annie’s struggle of not getting “the same husband” back that she sent off to war. They both had struggles that pushed them apart and together. Their commitment to each other and their struggles other were realistic. The voice of this story was masterfully created. You really felt like you were in the south with all the word choices and beautiful imagery.

I listened to the audiobook and just want to say that I really appreciated the change of female and male narrators depending on whose POV you were listening to. One thing that disappointed me in the audio is that part of the surprise ending was spoiled sooner than desired. To the careful listener, the narrator used the voice of the character who was supposed to be a mysterious voice. But none of that is the author’s fault. That’s just a review of the audio.

This story was fantastically done and would recommend it to anyone who likes real portrayals of family struggles, soldiers coming home from war, and those who generally just like to see real-life interwoven with an intriguing and engaging story.


Genre: Historial, 1945, Arkansas

Plot Overview:

Charlotte Anne Mattas longs to turn back the clock. Before her husband, Sam, went to serve his country in the war, he was the man everyone could rely on–responsible, intelligent, and loving. But the person who’s come back to their family farm is very different from the protector Annie remembers. Sam’s experience in the Pacific theater has left him broken in ways no one can understand–but that everyone is learning to fear.

Tongues start wagging after Sam nearly kills his own brother. Now when he claims to have seen men on the mountain when no one else has seen them, Annie isn’t the only one questioning his sanity and her safety. If there were criminals haunting the hills, there should be evidence beyond his claims. Is he really seeing what he says, or is his war-tortured mind conjuring ghosts?

Annie desperately wants to believe her husband. But between his irrational choices and his nightmares leaking into the daytime, she’s terrified he’s going mad. Can she trust God to heal Sam’s mental wounds–or will sticking by him mean keeping her marriage at the cost of her own life?

Debut novelist Janyre Tromp delivers a deliciously eerie, Hitchcockian story filled with love and suspense. Readers of psychological thrillers and historical fiction by Jaime Jo Wright and Sarah Sundin will add Tromp to their favorite authors list.

What I loved: The realistic struggle of not only Sam’s PTSD, but also the struggle of Annie as they navigated their marriage during a time when Sam wasn’t the same man she married.

Favorite Character and Why: Lots of people have been saying Dovie May, but honestly, Sam is my favorite. Maybe it’s because I can relate to him and his staunch decision to protect his family no matter what they think of him. I really love him and his fight to overcome his own personal mental challenges while being there for his family–even when he feels like a failure.

PURCHASE LINKS

Amazon  |  Baker Book House  |  Barnes & Noble  |  Books-A-Million  |  Bookshop  |  Book Depository  | Christianbook Distributors  |  IndieBound


Have you read it? What were your thoughts? If not, what about this story appeals to you?

 

 

RCR: The Refrain Within by Liz Tolsma

RCR: The Refrain Within by Liz Tolsma

We’ve finished the fourth month of the Unlocking the Past 2022 Reading Challenge: Around the World. This month we traveled to Eastern Europe, and with me being on deadline, my partner Among the Reads shares her review of The Refrain Within by Liz Tolsma. Once you read the review, don’t forget to comment to be entered for your chance to win a copy.

*Want more interaction and/or suggestions each month? Join the Facebook Group. Want a bookmark with the monthly themes? Fill out this Google Form. Need a reminder on the details of the challenge? Go to the Unlocking the Past Reading Challenge page.*

The Refrain Within

by Liz Tolsma

*Original Review, Quotes Images, and More can be found at https://amongthereads.net/the-refrain-within-by-liz-tolsma-book-review/*

Just between you and me, I can’t read many books dealing with the Holocaust. Or read them often. Reading about that terrible time in history tears me up inside!

A few years ago, I came across The Melody of the Soul by Liz Tolsma and was so intrigued by the synopsis, I decided to give it a chance. When the next book in the Music of Hope series came out, When the Heart Sings, I read that as well, this time with no hesitation. Though these stories stand alone, I still knew that I wanted to read The Refrain Within when it came out! I love that this series revolves around music during such a bleak time.

Patrick’s love for Éva and for music blends so beautifully! It is very touching the way she is his muse. The songs he composed that sprang from his affection, as well as his grief, were described so perfectly I felt that I could hear them!

I greatly admired Éva as she courageously sought her missing student, who was said to have been taken by the Nazis. She then did her small part to help ease the suffering there. Her struggle whether to trust Patrick was portrayed so well.

My heart ached as I read of the injury that was done to various characters. The author balanced telling the facts and not giving too many details well. Considering the cruelty that was inflicted on the Jews at this time, it was still painful to read – that is not the author’s fault.

Éva’s faith, understandably, was weak in the face of the destruction of lives and her beloved city. It was so precious to see her truly grasp the truth, first from her father and then from Patrick, that when God is our foundation, we cannot be shaken.

If you enjoy historical fiction with a strong Christian foundation, I recommend The Refrain Within.

PURCHASE LINKS

Amazon        Barnes & Noble      Books-a-Million      Book Depository      Bookshop.org      Christianbook.com     Indiebound.org


Giveaway

For your chance to win a print copy, comment with what book YOU read for this month and you will also be entered into the year-end Grand Prize Reader Basket. Use the Rafflecopter below for extra entries and to mark that you left a comment. Entries end on May 7th at midnight EST, and the winner will be drawn sometime that week and notified by email. The winner will be announced don’t the Rafflecopter widget. *Open to all residents of the contiguous USA, legally able to enter, and an e-book format or Amazon Gift Card will be awarded to those outside that range who are legally able to enter.

a Rafflecopter giveaway


What did you read for April’s Challenge? What do you hope to read in May?

The Debutante’s Code by Erica Vetsch

The Debutante’s Code by Erica Vetsch

The Debutante’s Code

by Erica Vetsch

With my book release, it’s been a while since I’ve done a book review, but y’all, this book. I haven’t been THIS excited about a series in quite a while. The Debutante’s Code is the first book in the Thorndike Mysteries series, and it has SPIES. I LOVE a good spy story and this one is not only a series but it is also intricately tied to my other favorite book from Erica Vetsch, The Gentleman Spy.  EEP!!! I CANNOT say enough about this book. It is going to be a yearly re-read for me. There is an amazing cast of characters, twists and turns that were fun and unexpected, and it’s all set in the sweeping setting of the Regency world. I love the mix of underworld connections with the glamor and beauty of a debutante’s life. I absolutely cannot wait to see how some of the characters are involved further down the road, and I seriously could devour this whole series without ever reading the back blurbs to see if they will intrigue me. The romance is light in this book, but there is definite attraction and the hope that something more will develop. SERIOUSLY, I CANNOT WAIT for the next book.

The Debutante’s Code will be adored by readers who enjoy spy novels, the Regency Era, and mysteries with excitement, drama, and of course LOTS of secrets.


Genre: Historial Romance, 1816 England

Plot Overview:

Jane Austen meets Sherlock Holmes in this new Regency mystery series

Newly returned from finishing school, Lady Juliette Thorndike is ready to debut in London society. Due to her years away, she hasn’t spent much time with her parents, and sees them only as the flighty, dilettante couple the other nobles love. But when they disappear, she discovers she never really knew them at all. They’ve been living double lives as government spies–and they’re only the latest in a long history of espionage that is the family’s legacy.

Now Lady Juliette is determined to continue their work. Mentored by her uncle, she plunges into the dangerous world of spy craft. From the glittering ballrooms of London to the fox hunts, regattas, and soirees of country high society, she must chase down hidden clues, solve the mysterious code her parents left behind, and stay out of danger. All the while, she has to keep her endeavors a secret from her best friend and her suitors–not to mention nosy, irritatingly handsome Bow Street runner Daniel Swann, who suspects her of a daring theft.

Can Lady Juliette outwit her enemies and complete her parents’ last mission? Or will it lead her to a terrible end?

Best-selling author Erica Vetsch is back with a rollicking, exciting new series destined to be a hit with Regency readers who enjoy a touch of mystery in their love stories. Fans of Julie Klassen, Sarah Ladd, and Anne Perry will love the wit, action, and romance.

What I loved: Can I say the entire adventure? I loved learning to be a spy with Juliette and watching Detective Swann interfere with her investigation. Also, I ADORED the connection to The Gentleman Spy. Having read it before this book, I was able to squeal over every little connection. It made it that much more enjoyable than if I’d just picked it up without any reference to The Gentleman Spy.

Favorite Character and Why: I loved the combination of Juliette and Daniel Swann. They were a perfect play-off of each other, and I very much enjoyed them. I cannot wait to watch them grow throughout the rest of the series. It’s seriously one I think I could follow for longer than three books which is something I’ve NEVER said before.

Who would like this?The Debutante’s Code will be adored by readers who enjoy spy novels, the Regency Era, and mysteries with excitement, drama, and of course LOTS of secrets.

PURCHASE LINKS

Amazon  |  Barnes & Noble  |  Books-A-Million  |  Bookshop  |  Book Depository  | Christianbook Distributors  |  IndieBound


Do you enjoy spy books? What other Historical fiction spy, mystery, or undercover book can you recommend?

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