A Fictional Non-Fiction Story

Okay, so I’m really breaking away from my normal routine of posting about historical fiction. I still haven’t gotten back into reading anything new (and I’m really really really tempted to revisit some old favorites), but I DID read an awesome writing craft book which was written like a fiction story.

How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method, is an entertaining read whether you are an author or not. Using characters from Goldilocks and the Three Bears, as well as other fairy tale stories, Randy Ingermanson explains his method of preparing for a story in an incredibly entertaining way.

How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method by Randy Ingermanson

Plot: Goldilocks has always wanted to write a novel, but everyone told her it was an impractical dream. So she followed the practical route of life only to pursue writing once her kids began school. To learn what it takes, she attends a writing conference where Baby Bear introduces her to the Snowflake method. On her journey through plotting her story, she makes friends with a wolf with a bad reputation, investigates a murder, and is placed in mortal danger when the answer is revealed.

Honestly, it is the FIRST non-fiction book EVER for me to read in two days. I probably would have read it in one, had I the time. So whether you are a reader or a writer, I actually recommend reading it.

It’s not my typical blog post, but hey! It’s Thanksgiving craziness and I’ve been reading a lot of non-fiction in preparation for another story. Next week I am going to post the top ten books I am thankful for, so be thinking about your top ten. I may or may not have a giveaway in mind. ūüėČ

What to Write Next?

As I approach the end of editing my first book (EEK!!) I am looking to the next book. What will I write? Will I continue with the next book in the series? Or will I write a different series I already have in mind? Or should I begin something new and completely stand-alone?

 

pencil-918449_640

 

I will be honest, my mind creates books in series of three. Each is a stand-alone novel in its own rights, so not a trilogy, but the characters are all connected and revisit one another. Those are the types of books I read and that seems to be how my mind writes as well. 

 

In fact, I have the next two books in the series already outlined and playing in my mind. However, some wise sage of the publishing world recommended that unpublished authors not write the next book in a series until they have a contract to do so. Otherwise, you will have wasted your time.

 

I am still praying that one through, because ultimately, God lets me know what is a waste of my time, but I am playing around with other new ideas.  My current inspiration comes from some fun pictures my family took over Christmas break in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.

So here is a peek at the ones that inspire a story in my mind:

dsc_0007

 

 

Don’t you dare cheat with crack-shot Donovan Marshal at the table.¬† The hardened, undercover Pinkerton agent isn’t fooled by tricks, but when Cassie Granger plays the trick of her life, will they both be fooled by what really is at stake?

 

 

 

dsc_0016

 

 

Former Confederate soldier, Elias Blake, just wants to put the war behind him and rebuild his farm. Upon returning his ramshackle home, he finds the enemy has moved in and taken claim on his land and possibly his heart.

 

 

 

dsc_0019_0

Escaping the law has always been a challenge she enjoyed… until she accidentally¬†married the law.

After a robbery gone wrong, Emily Hoppe is injured and mistaken for a mail-order bride. Not one to turn away a built-in cover, she intends to go along with the ruse until she is well enough to hightail it out of town.

U.S. Marshal Dirk Burn knows something isn’t quite right about his bride, and his instincts never fail him. Determined to sniff out the truth, he gets more than he bargained for when her outlaw family comes to her rescue.

 

 

Okay, so some really high-level ideas, but just maybe one of them will be my next story.

What about you? If you are a writer? How do you choose what to write next? If you are a reader, what makes you decide what to read next? Did any of our goofy pictures inspire you with story ideas? I’d love to hear them!

 

By the way, the winner of Cynthia Roemer’s signed copy of Under this same sky is:¬†

JANET ESTRIDGE

 

While we did purchase the rights to these pictures, I want to give credit where credit is due. Out of the 22 Old Time Photo places in that tourist-heavy area, we used Old Time Photo #5. Yes, the number is part of their name. You can visit them here if you are interested in checking them out. Our photographer was great.

 

 

WCW: Creating Well-Rounded Characters ‚Äď Dark Moment Stories

Characters are more than just the sum of their actions.  In the previous weeks, I discussed character archetypes and negative/positive personality traits, but all of these really just boil down to actions. So what more do you need to create a living, breathing, well-rounded character?

 

storyequationTo give your characters the breath of life, you need to give them a past full of good and bad experiences, even though their full back story will never be revealed to the reader. Susie May Warren does a fantastic job of explaining how she does this in her book The Story Equation (SEQ), and I highly recommend getting it. For the meantime, here is the basic process derived from her SEQ.

 

Developing Character History

Your character is who they are when they walk on the page due to their histories. As an author, it would be impossible create a comprehensive life story for your character from birth to the time they walk on the page. Many of those details are not important.

 
woman-1006100_640.jpgThe important details of our lives are those life-altering parts. Those moments in time that end up wounding you, burying a lie deep into your heart, and creating fears. Susie May Warren calls these Dark Moment Stories.

 

Dark Moment Stories

These dark moment stories aren’t as vague as “my parents divorced.” As bad as divorce is, moments within the divorce will be what really shaped the experience of your character. They are the stories that can be retold in detail to another character.

 

 

For example, take a story of a four-year-old boy whose father walked out on him. That memory is so painful, so poignant it becomes immortalized in the mind, twisting and growing roots down to the soul.

 

He can remember his Dad loading up the car, ignoring the son as he followed behind asking questions.

“Daddy, where are you going?”pain-1164308_640.jpg

“Can I go, Daddy?”

“Why is Mommy crying?”

“Can I help?”

Then it happened. Dad closed the door, separating the boy from him forever. The boy runs to the window and watches as the car putters off into the distance without one backward glance from the driver.

 

Imagine the wound developed by that. What fears would develop from that experience? The fear of abandonment. The fear of being unworthy. The fear of being out of control.

 

Lies will develop from this experience. I’ll never be good enough. I am unlovable. I can’t trust people. People I love will always end up leaving.

 

These lies and fears developed from the wound determine the actions of our characters and make them believable. The wounding story is what makes us sympathize the character and even connect with the character. You don’t have to have your father abandon you to understand the feeling of abandonment.

 

chains-19176_640

Bringing your characters to life means giving them experiences that readers can connect to and identify with. Give them experiences that define who they are at the beginning, but are overcome and redefined at the end.

 

Exercise Your Brain

This week, come up with your own dark moment story for a character (or use a real experience, we’ll never know!). Then tell us the possible lies and fears developed from that dark moment story. ¬†Come back and encourage one another and comment on the different stories.

WCW: Crafting the Perfect Chapter – It’s Elementary, My Dears

*This is an expanded edition of my guest blog post to Southern Writer’s Magazine on December 14, 2016.

Crafting the Perfect Chapter ‚Äď It‚Äôs Elementary, My Dears

 

school-1665535_640.jpg

 

Before becoming a stay-at-home-mom, I taught fifth-grade students to analyze writing. I hadn’t given much thought to applying what I taught to my own writing until I substitute taught a fifth-grade reading class. That day, I discovered a crucial concept for every fiction writer.

 

Students all over the country are forced summarize every chapter they read by looking for these key things:¬†Somebody… wants… but… so… then…

 

We, as writers, need to zero in on every chapter we write to make sure we can answer: Somebody‚Ķ wants…. but…. so… then…

 

How do we do this? It’s elementary, my dears.

 

georgewashingtonssocks

 

To illustrate this concept, I will use chapter eight of¬†George Washington’s Socks.¬† I will assume most my readers have not had the enjoyment of reading this children’s novel, so I will just give a very brief introduction to the story.

 

George Washington’s Socks

A mysterious rowboat transports five adventurous kids back in time to the eve of the Battle at Trenton where they experience the American Revolution. Through encounters with Hessian soldiers, revolutionaries, and even George Washington himself, Matthew, Quentin, Hooter, Tony, and Katie watch history unfold before their eyes as they see first-hand, the grim realities of war and the cost of freedom.

– Amazon.com Blurb

 

Somebody… wants… but… so… then…

Let’s break it down:

 

office-1454087_640

Somebody…

Who is the central focus of this chapter? This can be one or two characters if you are splitting your story between points of view, but even if there are multiple points of view, a chapter is generally about one person. Who would students identify as the main character for your chapter?

In George Washington’s Socks there are five focus characters, however, chapter eight focuses solely on the perspective of Matt.

 

Wants…

This is the goal of the main character for this chapter only. What is it that the character wants to accomplish in this small timeframe? More often than not it is a small goal that builds into something bigger.

 

For Matt, his initial goal in the chapter was to return General Washington’s cape.

 

But…town-sign-1158385_640

No story is engaging without conflict, and neither is a chapter. What obstacle does the character face? It can be internal or external in nature, but it needs to be plausible and, if at all possible, unforeseen.

 

Matt’s challenge comes in the form of a captain who believes Matt is a rebel soldier.

 

conversation-799448_640

So…

This is the reaction to the conflict. What does the character do? What does he/she think? Do they change their goal? What about the supporting characters? How do they respond to the conflict, and how does their response affect the main character?

 

Matt changes his goal. He goes from wanting to return General Washington’s cape to retreating to the safety of the boat.

 

california-1813238_640

¬†Then…

This is where a consequence occurs or an additional problem is added to the plot. There could be a hint to the subplot, or a difficult obstacle the character must face, or it could leave the reader with a cliffhanger. Whichever course you choose, the ‚Äúthen‚ÄĚ is used as a hook for the next chapter.

 

Matt‚Äôs chapter doesn‚Äôt end with him being forced into battle. His ‚Äúthen‚ÄĚ is the fatal injury of the only man who can get Matt home.

 

Combine all the elements and you get:

Matt¬†wanted to return General Washington’s cape but a Captain thought he was a rebel soldier trying to desert, so Matt tries to return to the boat.¬†Then, as Matt is being forced into battle, the only man who can get Matt and his friends home suffers a fatal injury.

 

books-1141910_640

Somebody… wants… but… so… then… is a quick, easy summary that drives to the heart of a chapter.  Do each of your chapters contain these elements? Could you summarize them in this way?

 

Even scarier…. could a fifth-grader?

 

I challenge you to share one of your chapters in this way, and just so I am being fair, here’s my example from chapter¬†one.

 

Kessara wants to pay off her grandfather’s debt, but she doesn’t want him to find out she had to save the family name again, so she goes to the cemetery at midnight to retrieve her secret stash of money. Then as she is returning to the carriage she stumbles upon a clandestine meeting between two criminals who spot her.

 

What do you think? How would you break down one of your chapters? 

 

Writing Craft Wednesday: The Story Equation

Have you struggled with flat characters? Difficult to plot stories? A lack of knowledge on how to correct these issues?

 

Oh my! I must admit I fall very solidly in this category. After the ACFW Conference, I realized just how much of a beginner I am. It feels like I have scrapped my story for the umpteenth time, but this time I have a solid plan.

 

One of the many benefits of attending the conference was connecting with Susan May Warren, a wonderful author and teacher. She has created this wonderful online community that is lesson based. It does require a membership, but the investment has been definitely worth the cost so far.

 

Due to the fact I do pay a membership, I have been hesitant to share what I have learned. I would not wish to break any copyright laws nor infringe on what Susie has spent so much time creating.

 

But lucky for you, one of the most helpful sets of lessons has recently been transcribed into a book that, even with access to the courses, I have added to my library of resources.

 

storyequation

 

The Story Equation: How to Plot & Write a Brilliant Story From One Powerful Question by Susan May Warren

 

Susie’s wonderful method is based on developing your POV characters from the inside out. I will not steal her thunder, for the information is not mine to share, but I will say this has become my new favorite method to work my story.

 

It is organic and naturally encourages great depth. The plot, theme, and premise developed around my characters with surprising results. My story already feels stronger with the use of the Story Equation (SEQ).

 

I will not lie.  As a beginner, I have spent many hours doing the courses, redoing them, and reading the book over and over again, working my characters as I did so. My characters are finally (mostly) solid and I am working on developing my major plot points.

 

The Kindle Edition of the book costs only $6.99. Let me tell you, this is an AMAZING price for an invaluable book. It is a quick and easy read, and easy to apply. If you can afford a monthly membership to her community, The Novel Academy, I would HIGHLY recommend that as well.

 

Below is the book blurb from Amazon. If you have any questions or experiences with the SEQ or Novel Academy, please comment below. I am so excited to share this resource with you!

 

 

“Discover The Story Equation!

One question can unlock your entire story! Are you struggling to build a riveting plot? Layered characters? How about fortify that saggy middle? Create that powerful ending?

You can build an entire book by asking one powerful question, and then plugging it into an ‚Äúequation‚ÄĚ that makes your plot and characters come to life. You‚Äôll learn how to build the external and internal journey of your characters, create a theme, build story and scene tension, create the character change journey and even pitch and market your story. All with one amazing question.

Learn:

    • The amazing trick to creating unforgettable, compelling characters that epic movies use!
    • How to create riveting tension to keep the story driving from chapter to chapter
    • The easy solution to plotting the middle of your novel
    • The one element every story needs to keep a reader up all night
    • How to craft an ending that makes your reader say to their friends, ‚ÄúOh, you have to read this book!‚ÄĚ

Using the powerful technique that has created over fifty RITA, Christy and Carol award-winning, best-selling novels, Susan May Warren will show novelists how to utilize The Story Equation to create the best story they‚Äôve ever written.”

– Blurb from Amazon

Writing Wednesday: NaNoWriMo Top Ten

Are you new to the writing scene? Maybe you’ve heard of NaNoWriMo. Maybe you’ve even attempted it or completed it. Maybe you are just even wondering what this crazy abbreviate even means.

Well, today my goal is to teach you what it is, give some ideas on how to prepare, and to create/share NaNoWriMo goals.

nanowrimo

What is NaNoWriMo?

NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month. On November 1st, writers all over the world begin working towards the goal of writing a 50,000-word novel by 11:59 pm on November 30th.

 

Intense. Insane. AMAZING.

 

It was established by a non-profit organization and actually has a very helpful web presence: http://nanowrimo.org/. In fact, if you sign up (free) there are badges you can earn to motivate you, forums you can join in on, a word count tracker, merchandise, and a way to connect with other NaNoWriMo crazies.

top_ten_list_c00230_19547

NaNoWriMo Top Ten Hints

In order to complete a 50,000 word novel (rough draft) you have to write 1,667 words every single day of November (including Thanksgiving!) Knowing me, I know that will NOT happen. So I am going to plan on doing it in 20 days which means I will need to write 2,500 words a session! Holy Moly!

 

Whether you complete the 50,000 words in 20 days or 30 days, you have to have a plan. So here you go, my top ten of NaNoWriMo hints.

1. Join NaNoWriMo.org.

Get the  the boost you need to plan and push through a crazy month of writing.

2. Get your family on board.

If your family is like mine in any form, they rely¬†heavily on your presence. NaNoWriMo means them committing to giving you time to work uninterrupted and probably more than one mean from a crockpot, pizza, and meals made by their own hands. If you don’t get your family on board, you will likely be pulled away often. I plan on bribing my family … I mean rewarding my family with lots of special meals, a couple movie marathons, and maybe a special outing to the zoo for Festival of the Lights.

3. Pre-schedule as many Blog, Facebook, or Twitter posts as you can.

There is no denying that social media is a time sucker but also necessary, especially for those building their platform. Consistency is key with your followers and taking a month off to write could be detrimental. So to avoid that do as much work beforehand and use apps like Hootsuite to schedule your posts ahead of time.

4. Flesh out your characters before you write using Susan May Warren’s book¬†The Story Equation¬†in October.

Next month, I will have a Writing Wednesday talking about this wonderful resource, but I highly recommend grabbing a copy and using it to help prepare for NaNoWriMo. I have been using it and I can tell you it has made a world of a difference with my plotting and character depth.

5. Figure out your GMC for each character in October.

If you don’t know what that is, check out these posts: Goal, Motivation, Conflict. Debra Dixon also has a fantastic book that you can find on my Write Resource page.

6. Plot out the main points of your story in October to give you direction.

I am a planster, somewhere between a plotter (outlining every detail) and a pantser (writing by the seat of my pants). I found that to make the most use of my time when I sit to write it helps to have a general plan of where I am going. With NaNoWriMo, writing time is a premium, so it is best to make the most of every moment.

7. Set aside your time to write and guard it like a butcher protecting his shop from a pack of starving dogs.

Just because you’re doing NaNoWriMo doesn’t mean life will stop, in fact, I have discovered that is when the starving dogs come to viciously attack. Set up barriers by marking off certain times to write, getting your family on board to protect and help you, and plan out the times you know you can’t write. As much as I would like to say I will write every day from 9 am to 2 pm, I know that isn’t going to happen. There are days I will substitute teach, doctors appointments, camping trips, and I¬†mustn’t forget preparing for Thanksgiving! Life happens and it seems to happen more abundantly in November.

8. Get together a motivational soundtrack to help you get those words typed out.

I am a fan of Jennifer Thomas’ Illumination¬†album. Her classical music is upbeat and gets my imagination going. For certain scenes I also have a few Christian inspirational songs to flow in the background and empower my writing. Later I may put these into a soundtrack to “release” with my novel.

9. Stock up on NaNoWriMo fuel: dark chocolate, tea, milk chocolate, coffee, hot chocolate, caffeine pills,¬†chocolate covered nuts…

Did I mention chocolate?

10. Turn off your inner editor and just write. Remember:

worstthingyouwrite

 

So what about you? Are you joining in NaNoWriMo? Let me know! I would love to cheer you on! Are there any other tips or suggestions you would share for other NaNoWriMo participants?

Pin It on Pinterest